Top netballers in Intercol showdown

first_imgSeveral of the country’s top senior netballers will be in action at the University of the West Indies (UWI) netball court as the top four collegiate teams, The Mico University College, UWI, G.C. Foster College and University of Technology (UTech), contest the semi-finals of the senior, junior and intermediate inter-collegiate competitions.In junior action, which starts at 2:00 p.m., Mico ‘C’ will face Northern Caribbean University (NCU) and G.C. Foster ‘C’ go up against Church Teachers’ College. The intermediate semis are set to follow at 3:00 p.m., with Mico ‘B’ facing G.C. Foster ‘B’ and EXED Community College lock horns with UWI ‘B’.Most of the attention will be focused on the senior showdowns at 4:00 p.m. G.C. Foster will face UWI, while Mico will go up against UTech.Finding formDefending champions G.C. Foster ‘A’ are looking to find their best form after not being at their best in the preliminary round, where they lost twice against Mico and UWI, to finish third. They will be hoping to avenge their three-goal defeat at home three weeks ago.Stacyann Facey will lead the charge for G.C. Foster and should get good support from former national Under-16 players, goal shooter April Thompson and goal attack Deneen Taylor, along centre Adeen Thomas.Meanwhile UWI, with one defeat – a narrow one to Mico – will be hoping to get the better of their opponents. They will be relying on their experience captain Nadine Bryan at wing attack, their tall goal defence, Shameera Sterling and goal shooter Thristina Harwood, all national representatives.Pre-season favourites and Open Rally champions, Mico, have been in great form all season and are yet to lose a match, winning all seven to top the preliminary round with 21 points. Early in the season they easily defeated UTech by 17 goals and look set to advance to their third final in a row.National goal shooter Jhaniele Fowler has been a tower of strength this season for the Mico team and with their good centre court led by Trishauna Hanson and the experienced national player, Vangelee Williams, at goal defence, they will be hard to beat.The winners will advance to Saturday’s final, which is scheduled for G.C. Foster College.last_img read more

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Wheelchair competition gets going at US Open

first_imgDavid Wagner returns a shot during a practice session for the wheelchair competition at the U.S. Open tennis tournament, Wednesday, Sept. 5, 2018, in New York. (AP Photo/Darron Cummings)NEW YORK — David Wagner is attempting to win his fourth U.S. Open singles title and his ninth in doubles.The United States’ most decorated wheelchair player begins his run Thursday in the U.S. Open Wheelchair Competition, part of a field of 20, that also includes Kgothatso “KG” Montjane, who this year became the first black South African woman, wheelchair or not, to play at Wimbledon.ADVERTISEMENT ’10 French champ Schiavone retires, shifts focus to coaching Wheelchair tennis has been around for more than four decades with 120 professional events in 80 countries, but only recently become a mainstay all four Grand Slams.It has been played at the U.S. Open since 2005, but did not have a match in Arthur Ashe Stadium until last year. It will have two more played there this week.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSJapeth Aguilar wins 1st PBA Finals MVP award for GinebraSPORTSTim Cone still willing to coach Gilas but admits decision won’t be ‘simple yes or no’“The Grand Slams incorporating wheelchair tennis has brought a new sense of notoriety and professionalism to our sport,” said Jason Harnett, the USTA’s national manager for wheelchair tennis.“The fact that we’re engaged here has made it much more popular with the able-bodied population, because now they have access to our elite athletes.” Ginebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup title Japeth Aguilar embraces role, gets rewarded with Finals MVP plum It’s OK to notice the wheelchair, as long as that’s not all fans see, said 27-year-old American Dana Mathewson, who lost her ability to walk when she was 10 years old because of a rare neurological disease.What they can expect from a match, she said, is elite players whizzing around the court, flying into the net and getting to shots that seem impossible to make.“We are athletes, one and the same as everybody else here,” she said. “We work just as hard. We prepare just as well. It’s just that we do things a little bit differently. But we are athletes, and that’s what we want people to see.”The players say it is hard for many of them to make a living solely by playing wheelchair tennis. The wheelchair athletes here are competing for $350,000 in total prize money, and the singles winners ($31,200 for men and women, $23,400 for the quad) will take home less than a first-round loser receives ($54,000) in the main singles draw, said Wagner.The players said the next big step for the sport will be to increase the size of the draws at major tournaments, so the money is spread among more players and fans aren’t seeing the same 20 athletes over and over.But Montjane, who was born with a congenital condition that affected the growth of her limbs, said she and most wheelchair athletes aren’t playing just for the money.“I am a woman who came from a disadvantaged background and grew up with a disability,” she said. “For me, it’s about giving hope and sharing with others that we live in the world of possibilities. You’re disability doesn’t define your abilities.”Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award It has also led to some new milestones for the sport. Australian Dylan Alcott beat Wagner in January in an Australian Open final that was played for the first time inside Rod Laver Arena and in front of a national TV audience.“Those are some huge strides,” said the 44-year-old Wagner, who has been playing competitively since 1999.This week’s competition will include men’s and women’s singles and doubles, as well as quad singles and doubles, which involves players who have substantial loss of function in at least one upper limb.Wagner plays in the quad division. He was a community college tennis player before an accident at the beach when he was 21. He was jumping for a Frisbee when he was flipped by a wave and landed on his head.He understands that the first thing fans see during a wheelchair match is the chair. They also notice that athletes can play the ball on the second bounce, which is the only rules difference between wheelchair and able-bodied tennis.ADVERTISEMENT Allen Durham still determined to help Meralco win 1st PBA title Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew MOST READ View comments Tim Cone, Ginebra set their sights on elusive All-Filipino crown Nadine Lustre’s phone stolen in Brazil Gov’t to employ 6,000 displaced by Taal Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew LATEST STORIES Gretchen Barretto’s daughter Dominique graduates magna cum laude from California collegelast_img read more

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