HP goes wooden with Envy at Computex 2019

first_img Computex 2019 Computex 2019 Share your voice Preview • HP Omen X: A battery-powered VR backpack for cutting the virtual cable Tags Laptops Desktops $1,199 HP strives for novel style with its Envy and Elite laptops CNET may get a commission from retail offers. Mentioned Above HP Omen X Compact Desktop May 30 • Alienware redesigns its thin gaming laptops and offers OLED One of the wood-veneered Envys. Sarah Tew/CNET Among HP’s blizzard of announcements at Computex 2019, a handful stand out from the run-of-the-mill refreshes. For sheer novelty, there’s the new Wood series option for its Envy laptops and convertibles, with wood veneers on the palm rests  and touchpad. They definitely add a little pizzazz to a metal body, though I’m not sure the touchpad is a good place for veneer. HP plans to start offering it in the fall but hasn’t announced pricing.HP EliteBook x2The Elite x2 G4, which allows you to detach the screen to use it as a tablet, wraps its body in leather. Sarah Tew/CNET And following up the splashy launch of the consumer Spectre Folio at the end of 2018, HP’s adapted the leather-clad design for its Microsoft Surface-competitor business detachable, the Elite x2 G4. The x2 also incorporates HP’s Sure View privacy screen technology.The Elite x2 G4 is slated to ship in August starting at $1,500.12-hp-nda-laptop-workstation-loriThe ZBook mobile workstation line debuts the 17-inch Dreamcolor display with a DCI-P3 gamut. Sarah Tew/CNET Less pretty but more practical, HP has updated its ZBook 15 and 17 mobile workstations with an option for a new 4K Dreamcolor display capable of the DCI-P3 gamut (Dreamcolor is HP’s color-controlled display system and has traditionally been Adobe RGB) as well as a configuration option for the new Nvidia Quadro RTX 5000 graphics processor. While the new mobile processor is in designed to fit in thinner systems, hopefully it will allow big systems like these ZBooks to attain improved battery life. HP Omen X Compact Desktop See it May 29 • The laptops of tomorrow will make us even more productive — and it’s terrifying May 29 • The outrageous computer cases of Computex 2019 • See All And if you needed another sign that there’s more enthusiasm for VR among commercial users than consumers, HP has rejiggered its VR backpack strategy: There’s no more Omen X Compact Desktop. Instead HP is merging its commercial line with the consumer line, dispensing with the “Omen X” gaming branding and going with the “HP VR Backpack” name and a lower-key design. It’s been refreshed with slight improvements to the harness — the battery packs sit higher now near the kidneys rather than on the hips — and battery swapping is a little quicker. You can use it with the new HP Reverb VR headset. Post a comment May 30 • Computex 2019: Every announcement you need to know reading • HP goes wooden with Envy at Computex 2019 0 19 Photos Virtual Reality HP Microsoft Nvidialast_img read more

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Genetic study shows explosion of diversity in fish after endCretaceous mass extinction

first_img Reef fish arrived in two waves Journal information: Nature Ecology & Evolution A team of researchers from several institutions across the U.S. has found evidence suggesting that there was an explosion of diversity in fish after the end-Cretaceous mass extinction. In their paper published in the journal Nature Ecology and Evolution, the team describes their genetic study involving more than 1800 species of fish and what they found. Credit: CC0 Public Domain After the end-Cretaceous mass extinction—the one that killed off the dinosaurs—mammals became much more diverse and dominant. Without the dinosaurs to feast on them, they were free to prosper. Much less is known about what went on in the oceans. In this new effort, the researchers have added some new pieces to that puzzle.Prior research has suggested that the asteroid or comet that smashed into the Earth approximately 65 million years ago killed off more than the dinosaurs—approximately 50 percent of all species worldwide disappeared. These include many sharks and other reptiles, leaving a void of sorts in the world’s oceans that allowed fish to flourish. And flourish they did, according to the researchers with this new effort.To learn more about what happened with sea creatures after the end-Cretaceous mass extinction, the researchers collected tissue samples from 118 acanthomorph species, looking specifically at 1,000 DNA sequences that were similar across the genomes of their samples—as part of that effort, they searched for variations in genetic sequences that offered clues regarding how closely related the fish were to one another.The researchers found that six large groups of fish originated over the course of 10 million years after the mass extinction. Of those groups, five were acanthomorphs (spiny-rayed fish). Today, there are approximately 18,000 members of the acanthomorphs species and they represent approximately one in three vertebrate species alive today. That so many of them originated in the time after the dinosaurs disappeared shows that they, like mammals, found the world a much friendlier place—one where they were allowed to prosper. Such an explosion suggests that sharks and other reptile populations and their diversity must have plunged, leaving a vast void for the acanthomorphs to fill. Still unclear is why acanthomorphs, rather than other fish species, became so dominant. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.center_img Explore further More information: Michael E. Alfaro et al. Explosive diversification of marine fishes at the Cretaceous–Palaeogene boundary, Nature Ecology & Evolution (2018). DOI: 10.1038/s41559-018-0494-6AbstractThe Cretaceous–Palaeogene (K–Pg) mass extinction is linked to the rapid emergence of ecologically divergent higher taxa (for example, families and orders) across terrestrial vertebrates, but its impact on the diversification of marine vertebrates is less clear. Spiny-rayed fishes (Acanthomorpha) provide an ideal system for exploring the effects of the K–Pg on fish diversification, yet despite decades of morphological and molecular phylogenetic efforts, resolution of both early diverging lineages and enormously diverse subclades remains problematic. Recent multilocus studies have provided the first resolved phylogenetic backbone for acanthomorphs and suggested novel relationships among major lineages. However, these new relationships and associated timescales have not been interrogated using phylogenomic approaches. Here, we use targeted enrichment of >1,000 ultraconserved elements in conjunction with a divergence time analysis to resolve relationships among 120 major acanthomorph lineages and provide a new timescale for acanthomorph radiation. Our results include a well-supported topology that strongly resolves relationships along the acanthomorph backbone and the recovery of several new relationships within six major percomorph subclades. Divergence time analyses also reveal that crown ages for five of these subclades, and for the bulk of the species diversity in the sixth, coincide with the K–Pg boundary, with divergences between anatomically and ecologically distinctive suprafamilial clades concentrated in the first 10 million years of the Cenozoic. © 2018 Phys.org Citation: Genetic study shows explosion of diversity in fish after end-Cretaceous mass extinction (2018, March 13) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-03-genetic-explosion-diversity-fish-end-cretaceous.htmllast_img read more

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