News Notes From WCTV Did You Know WCTV Has A Podcast Studio

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Wilmington Community Television has seen a Podcast explosion in 2019. Have you noticed?Let me start with the quick explanation on podcasting. Podcasts are like radio, but you listen to it on-demand. They are typically a series with a common theme. You can listen to WCTV podcasts through the WCTV App, Soundclound and through the Apple Podcast App. Just search for WCTV. We also list them on our website at wctv.org/programs.WCTV currently has nine podcast series being produced inside our podcast studio. Two of those are driven by WCTV staff. But the other seven come from residents who are interested in sharing their stories, their insights and their interests. If you’re new to podcasting, or very familiar with the platform, I invite you to check out these series from Wilmington producers. It’s been a long time since we’ve seen this sort of widespread creativity in our studio.“Namaste with Renee” is the newest series. Renee Marcou has been spending hours in the studio over the past month putting together her program, which talks a lot about finding your inner peace.“Quick Health Concepts” with Dr. Leslee Quick is all about healthy living. Her first two podcasts talked about cannabis and its applications in health, with specific mentions of CBD and how it’s different than marijuana.“Fresh Perspectives” from Caroline Buckley is produced in partnership with the Substance Abuse Coalition and deals specifically with substance use and recovery.“Minding Your Business” with Amy LaMarche invites local business owners to come in and talk about their industry and offer tips for potential customers. It’s not a sales pitch. It’s all about educating the consumer.“TaP: Teens and Parents” features the mother-son combo of Erica and Connor Marchant. This series delves into issues that families face. The most recent episode was all about social media use and the internet in general.“Mark’s Musings” is one of our longest-running podcasts from producer Mark Ryan. Mark interviews authors in a very conversational setting.“Now This With the North Nurse” is on summer break. But these short clips from Jane Ferrara and Heather Peachey deal with healthy concepts at school. Usually complete with sound effects!“How To Make a Memory” isn’t produced in our studio. But we wouldn’t feel right leaving Jen Tierney’s podcast off this list. Her Wilmington-based series is all about making memories with the ones you love.I mentioned at the beginning that we also have a pair of staff-produced podcasts. At the top of the list is Bridging the Digital Divide, WCTV’s award-winning podcast produced by staff member Lisa Kapala and Brad McKenna from the Wilmington Memorial Library. If you often feel like technology is leaving you behind, this series will get you caught up. We also do a monthly “Member Spotlight” featuring one of our WCTV members.Do you want to join the list of Wilmington podcasters? WCTV will train you on the equipment and host your series on our account. Contact Lisa Kapala at lisa@wctv.org to learn more. If nothing else, please check out an episode. You might be surprised at what you hear.(NOTE: The above announcement was submitted by WCTV Executive Director Shaun Neville.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedNews & Notes From WCTV: WCTV Executive Director Shaun Neville Answers YOUR QuestionsIn “Community”WCTV Wants To Help YOU Launch Your Own PodcastIn “Community”PODCAST: Listen To Wilmington Substance Abuse Coalition’s New PodcastIn “Videos”last_img read more

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Disclosure of property jewelry and overseas account holdings not allowed in PMGKY

first_imgThe Central Board of Direct Taxes (CBDT) on Wednesday clarified that assets in overseas accounts, jewelry, stocks and immovable property cannot be declared through the government’s new tax amnesty scheme. Black money purge: Demonetisation not a cure, says AssochamUnder the Pradhan Mantri Garib Kalyan Yojana (PMGKY), the CBDT said, only undisclosed income deposited in any bank or post office account can be declared by paying 50 percent of the amount in taxes and surcharges. Also, a quarter of the total sum should be parked in a non-interest bearing deposit for four years. In 2016, the government had announced its first Income Disclosure Scheme (IDS), which closed on September 30, 2016, for holders of unaccounted wealth held in cash as well as other forms such as immovable property and jewelry. Under the new income disclosure plan, a person can avail the scheme for any assessment year commencing on or before April 1, 2017. Further, deposits made in the bank account prior to the financial year 2016-17 can also be declared under the scheme.The tax department noted that a declaration under the PMGKY Scheme can be filed for deposits made in an account maintained with a specified entity by any mode such as cash, cheque, RTGS, NEFT or any electronic transfer system. The cash seized by the department and deposited in the public deposit account may be allowed to be adjusted for making payment of tax, surcharge and penalty under the scheme on the request of the person from whom the cash is seized. “However, the said amount shall not be allowed to be adjusted for making deposits under the scheme.” On the issue of a person against whom a search/survey operation has been initiated, such a person is “eligible to file the declaration under the scheme,” the CBDT said. However, no credit for advance tax paid, TDS or TCS shall be allowed under the PMGKY.last_img read more

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Ancient avian bones found in China may be oldest example of chicken

first_img Journal information: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (Phys.org) —A team of researchers in China studying ancient avian bones found in the northern part of that country, suspect the remains may be that of the oldest known example of chicken domestication. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the researchers describe their analysis and report on their findings. More information: “Early Holocene chicken domestication in northern China.” PNAS 2014 ; published ahead of print November 24, 2014, DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1411882111AbstractChickens represent by far the most important poultry species, yet the number, locations, and timings of their domestication have remained controversial for more than a century. Here we report ancient mitochondrial DNA sequences from the earliest archaeological chicken bones from China, dating back to ∼10,000 B.P. The results clearly show that all investigated bones, including the oldest from the Nanzhuangtou site, are derived from the genus Gallus, rather than any other related genus, such as Phasianus. Our analyses also suggest that northern China represents one region of the earliest chicken domestication, possibly dating as early as 10,000 y B.P. Similar to the evidence from pig domestication, our results suggest that these early domesticated chickens contributed to the gene pool of modern chicken populations. Moreover, our results support the idea that multiple members of the genus Gallus, specifically Gallus gallus and Gallus sonneratii contributed to the gene pool of the modern domestic chicken. Our results provide further support for the growing evidence of an early mixed agricultural complex in northern China.Press release Beijing Fatty Chicken, a local Chinese breed. Credit: Huagui Liu. Researchers track global dispersion of chickens throughout history using DNA Citation: Ancient avian bones found in China may be oldest example of chicken domestication (2014, November 25) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-11-ancient-avian-bones-china-oldest.htmlcenter_img Explore further © 2014 Phys.org Identifying the first culture to domesticate chickens has been hotly debated for over a century, without any clear winner, and it may remain that way as evidence is piling up suggesting that chickens were likely domesticated in a variety of places across the globe and have since undergone comingling, creating a mish-mash of genetic evidence. In this new effort, the researchers sought to find out if ancient bone samples found in four different archeological sites in northern China were chicken ancestors and if so, if they were domesticated. The bones were found alongside charcoal and other animal remains, such as dogs and pigs, both of which are believed to have been domesticated by that time in history, suggesting that the bird bones were from a species that had been domesticated as well. The excavation sites have also given up other findings which suggest the people who’d been barbecuing the animals were farmers, not hunters, which also adds credence to the idea that the birds they were eating were domesticated. The bones in question (39 in all) had been previously carbon dated to various ages, ranging from 2,300 to 10,500 years ago. The new research focused on gathering genetic evidence and using mitochondrial DNA sequencing to determine if the birds were chicken ancestors, or not. The team compared the DNA of the ancient birds with modern birds of the Galliformes order, which include rock partridges, pheasants and of course chickens and also to samples of ancient bones found in other places, such as Spain, Hawaii, Easter Island and Chile. Their analyses revealed that the birds were members of the genus Gallus, which includes modern chickens. But it’s still not enough to prove that they were actually the first example of domesticated chickens because there is still no conclusive proof that the birds were actually domesticated. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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