News Notes From WCTV Did You Know WCTV Has A Podcast Studio

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Wilmington Community Television has seen a Podcast explosion in 2019. Have you noticed?Let me start with the quick explanation on podcasting. Podcasts are like radio, but you listen to it on-demand. They are typically a series with a common theme. You can listen to WCTV podcasts through the WCTV App, Soundclound and through the Apple Podcast App. Just search for WCTV. We also list them on our website at wctv.org/programs.WCTV currently has nine podcast series being produced inside our podcast studio. Two of those are driven by WCTV staff. But the other seven come from residents who are interested in sharing their stories, their insights and their interests. If you’re new to podcasting, or very familiar with the platform, I invite you to check out these series from Wilmington producers. It’s been a long time since we’ve seen this sort of widespread creativity in our studio.“Namaste with Renee” is the newest series. Renee Marcou has been spending hours in the studio over the past month putting together her program, which talks a lot about finding your inner peace.“Quick Health Concepts” with Dr. Leslee Quick is all about healthy living. Her first two podcasts talked about cannabis and its applications in health, with specific mentions of CBD and how it’s different than marijuana.“Fresh Perspectives” from Caroline Buckley is produced in partnership with the Substance Abuse Coalition and deals specifically with substance use and recovery.“Minding Your Business” with Amy LaMarche invites local business owners to come in and talk about their industry and offer tips for potential customers. It’s not a sales pitch. It’s all about educating the consumer.“TaP: Teens and Parents” features the mother-son combo of Erica and Connor Marchant. This series delves into issues that families face. The most recent episode was all about social media use and the internet in general.“Mark’s Musings” is one of our longest-running podcasts from producer Mark Ryan. Mark interviews authors in a very conversational setting.“Now This With the North Nurse” is on summer break. But these short clips from Jane Ferrara and Heather Peachey deal with healthy concepts at school. Usually complete with sound effects!“How To Make a Memory” isn’t produced in our studio. But we wouldn’t feel right leaving Jen Tierney’s podcast off this list. Her Wilmington-based series is all about making memories with the ones you love.I mentioned at the beginning that we also have a pair of staff-produced podcasts. At the top of the list is Bridging the Digital Divide, WCTV’s award-winning podcast produced by staff member Lisa Kapala and Brad McKenna from the Wilmington Memorial Library. If you often feel like technology is leaving you behind, this series will get you caught up. We also do a monthly “Member Spotlight” featuring one of our WCTV members.Do you want to join the list of Wilmington podcasters? WCTV will train you on the equipment and host your series on our account. Contact Lisa Kapala at lisa@wctv.org to learn more. If nothing else, please check out an episode. You might be surprised at what you hear.(NOTE: The above announcement was submitted by WCTV Executive Director Shaun Neville.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedNews & Notes From WCTV: WCTV Executive Director Shaun Neville Answers YOUR QuestionsIn “Community”WCTV Wants To Help YOU Launch Your Own PodcastIn “Community”PODCAST: Listen To Wilmington Substance Abuse Coalition’s New PodcastIn “Videos”last_img read more

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UNHCR operations chief in city to see Rohingya crisis

first_imgUNHCR’s assistant high commissioner for operations George Okoth-Obbo has arrived in Bangladesh to see the Rohingya situation on the ground, reports UNB.In Cox’s Bazar, the head of UNHCR operations who arrived in Bangladesh on a three-day visit on Tuesday, will meet Rohingya refugee families to better understand their needs and review UNHCR’s response, UNHCR spokesperson Adrian Edwards said in a press briefing at the Palais des Nations in Geneva.While in Dhaka, he will meet Bangladeshi authorities to underline UNHCR’s readiness to significantly ramp up its response and provide support to the government in addressing the humanitarian needs and ensuring the protection of refugees, according to a message UNB received from Geneva.Meanwhile, UNHCR emergency airlift lands in Dhaka as Rohingya crisis deepens further.On the other hand, Mohammed Abdiker Mohamud, director of the department of operations and emergency, International Organization for Migration (IOM), and their teams are also currently visiting the country to observe the current influx of Rohingya refugees from Myanmar into Bangladesh.last_img read more

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Applying deep learning to motion capture with DeepLabCut

first_img Citation: Applying deep learning to motion capture with DeepLabCut (2018, August 23) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-08-deep-motion-capture-deeplabcut.html © 2018 Tech Xplore More information: Alexander Mathis et al. DeepLabCut: markerless pose estimation of user-defined body parts with deep learning, Nature Neuroscience (2018). DOI: 10.1038/s41593-018-0209-yAbstractQuantifying behavior is crucial for many applications in neuroscience. Videography provides easy methods for the observation and recording of animal behavior in diverse settings, yet extracting particular aspects of a behavior for further analysis can be highly time consuming. In motor control studies, humans or other animals are often marked with reflective markers to assist with computer-based tracking, but markers are intrusive, and the number and location of the markers must be determined a priori. Here we present an efficient method for markerless pose estimation based on transfer learning with deep neural networks that achieves excellent results with minimal training data. We demonstrate the versatility of this framework by tracking various body parts in multiple species across a broad collection of behaviors. Remarkably, even when only a small number of frames are labeled (~200), the algorithm achieves excellent tracking performance on test frames that is comparable to human accuracy. As Wei and Kording note, scientists have been trying to apply motion capture to humans and animals for well over a century—the idea is to capture the intricacies of all the tiny movements that together make up a larger, more noticeable movement, such as a single dance step. Being able to track such movements in animals offers some clues regarding their biomechanics and how their brains work. Being able to do so with humans can aid in physical therapy efforts or improvements in sports performance. The current process involves video recording the subject and carrying out a laborious process of tagging images frame by frame. In this new effort, the researchers have developed a computer automation technique to carry out the process, making it much faster and easier.To create DeepLabCut, the group trained a neural network using information from a database called Imagenet that contains a massive number of images and associated metadata. They then developed an algorithm that optimized estimations of poses. The third piece was the software that runs the algorithm, interacts with users and offers output of results. The result is a tool that can be used to perform motion capture on humans and virtually any other creature. All a user has to do is upload samples of what they are after, say, pictures of a squirrel, with its major parts labeled and some videos demonstrating how it moves in general. Then the user uploads video of a subject doing an activity of interest—say, a squirrel cracking open a nut. The software does the rest, producing motion capture of the activity. The team has made the new tool freely accessible to anyone who wishes to use it for whatever purpose they choose. Wei and Kording suggest the tool could revolutionize motion capture, making it easily available to professionals and novices alike. The hand of a mouse is automatically tracked with DeepLabCut, and the trajectories show the future (left) and past (far right) movements. Credit: Mathis et al, 2018 Explore further Making animated characters jump just got easier This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in Germany and the U.S. has developed a deep learning algorithm that can be used for motion capture of animals of any kind. In their paper published in the journal Nature Neuroscience, the group describes their tracking tool called DeepLabCut, how it works and how to use it. Kunlin Wei and Konrad Kording with the University of Peking and the University of Pennsylvania respectively offer a News & Views piece on the work done by the group in the same journal issue. Journal information: Nature Neuroscience Markerless pose estimation during behavior and across multiple species is crucial for many applications in neuroscience. Common model organisms are depicted in action, with the their past trajectories illustrated. Credit: Ella Maru Studio A fruit fly moving in a 3D chamber is automatically tracked with DeepLabCut Credit: Mathis et al, 2018last_img read more

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