NEED TO GET OR RENEW YOUR PASSPORT Wilmington Library Boston Passport Agency

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Need a new passport? Visit the Passport Day Event at the Wilmington Memorial Library (175 Middlesex Avenue) on Saturday, November 10, 2018, from 9am to 1pm.Presented by the Boston Passport Agency and the Library, the event is open to everyone. Walk-ins are welcome, but to schedule an appointment in advance, email your name and phone number to BostonPassportDay@state.gov.To apply for a U.S. Passport Book and/or card, attendees must bring a completed U.S. Passport Application or U.S. Password Renewal Application (which can be found at http://www.travel.state.gov), Citizenship Evidence, Photocopy of Citizenship Evidence, Identification, Photocopy of Identification, Passport Photo, and Check or Money Order For Payment. Please see the flyer below for specifics as to what exactly to bring. Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedNEED TO GET OR RENEW YOUR PASSPORT? Wilmington Library & Boston Passport Agency To Hold Passport Event On May 12In “Community”The Wilmington Insider For May 12, 2018In “5 Things To Do Today”Wilmington Memorial Library Receives $7,500 Federal Grant To Provide Programs On Healthy AgingIn “Community”last_img read more

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Threedimensional femtosecond laser nanolithography of crystals

first_img Explore further Wet etching nanopore lattices engineered by 3DLW in YAG. a) Nanopore lattice etched for 120 hours with average pore dimensions (257 ± 7 nm and 454 ± 13 nm) along x and y directions and 1 mm length along z. b) Vertically overlapping nanopores after 2 h wet etching (average dimensions of 131 ± 5 nm and 1,300 ± 35 nm along x and y, and 1 mm lengths). c) Top optical microscope view of nanopores along the z direction etched for 1 hour (129 ± 6.8 µm length). Credit: Nature Photonics, doi: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41566-018-0327-9 Etching nanopores in YAG along mm to cm scale lengths. (A) Optical microscope side view of etched pores. (B) Optical microscope top view of etched nanopores. (C) SEM side view of etched nanopores. Credit: Nature Photonics, doi: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41566-018-0327-9. Subwavelength diffraction gratings and MOW (micro optical waveguides) in YAG (yttrium aluminum garnet) crystals. a) Image of a centimeter-long, 700 nm pitch grating under visible light illumination. b) Experimental and calculated absolute diffraction efficiencies of a subwavelength grating (700 nm pitch) with 1,070 nm wavelength. Efficiency is calculated as the diffracted power divided by the power incident to the embedded grating. Error bars correspond to the experimental standard deviation of ~0.07%. Inset: scanning electron microscopy (SEM) close-up image of the fabricated grating. c) Optical waveguide with hexagonal structure, 500 nm horizontal pore-to-pore spacing, mean pore size of 166 × 386 nm^2 and 4 mm length. d) Simulated intensity mode profile at 1,550 nm with full-width at half maximums (FWHMs) of 862 nm (vertical) and 972 nm (horizontal). e) Diffraction- limited near-field image of the waveguide output mode measured at 1,550 nm, with a FWHM of ~1.5 µm. Credit: Nature Photonics, doi: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41566-018-0327-9 Within 170 hours, the scientists achieved nanopores with cross-sections of 368 x 726 nm2 and lengths of 3.1 mm; to show that nanopores with millimeter-scale length could be engineered in a single etching step. Nanophotonic devices typically require such lattice dimensions from the micrometric to the centimeter scale, without brittle fracture of the crystal due to excessive stress. In this way, the scientists implemented a scheme to homogenously etch nanostructures and microstructured optical waveguides (MOWs), on the desired scale across the whole sample.To test if the observed selectivity of nanopore etching with YAG was transferrable to other crystal types, the scientists conducted similar experimental nanostructuring with sapphire. They found a parallel nanopore etch rate of ~1 x 105 in sapphire, similar to YAG and higher than the rate previously observed with microchannels etched in sapphire. Ródenas and co-workers formed millimeter-long nanopores in sapphire with cross-sections as small as ~120 nm and tested the feasibility of the method by engineering nanopore lattices etched for 170 hours without fracturing the crystal. The results showed an etching selectivity at a value larger than 1 x 105 at the molecuar level between the modified and pristine crystalline states, hitherto not observed in a photo-irradiated material. The observed value was approximately two orders of magnitude higher than that of alumina etch masks on silicon. Ródenas et al. determined the etching rate of unmodified YAG at ~1 nm/hour. The proposed method allowed the design and fabrication of nanophotonic elements inside a crystal that could provide the desired optical responses, at the subwavelength structure. The scientists were able to control the features of pore direction, size, shape, filling fraction and length of nanopore lattices in YAG crystals by combining 3DLW and wet etching.The YAG lattice was etched for 120 hours to obtain average pore dimensions in the x and y directions. The pore shape and size were controlled by tailoring the laser power and polarization. The diameter of etched nanopores depended on the laser power and could be studied for both linear and circular laser beam polarizations. As limitations of the technique, they found that 3-D photonic structures were characteristically isolated in space, needed supporting walls, and suffered shrinkage and a low optical damage threshold. Optical properties of materials are based on their chemistry and the inherent subwavelength architecture, although the latter remains to be characterized in depth. Photonic crystals and metamaterials have proven this by providing access through surface alterations to a new level of light manipulation beyond the known natural optical properties of materials. Yet, in the past three decades of research, technical methods have been unable to reliably nanostructure hard optical crystals beyond the material surface for in-depth optical characterization and related applications. The capability to control lattice formation down to the nanometer scale will be useful in practical photonic applications. For instance, photonic bandgap lattices can be designed with stopbands in the visible to mid-infrared range in solid-state laser crystals for photonic information technology. To further expand the potential of the 3-D nanolithography technique, Ródenas et al. engineered MOW (microstructured optical waveguides) with different lattice spacings and cavity sizes. They obtained dimensions in the range of a centimeter in length, with 700 nm pitch grating observed under visible light illumination. Ródenas et al. conducted theoretical and simulation methods of the subwavelength gratings prior to their material fabrication. For the numerical simulations, they used the finite element method (FEM) in COMSOL Multiphysics 4.2 software. The scientists used the same FEM software and method to model YAG MOWs prior to fabrication.This ability to create controlled 3-D nanostructures of crystals opens up new routes to design compact, monolithic solid-state lasers. The resulting crystals can incorporate traditional cavity elements (gratings, fibres, microfluidic cooling channels) or novel microresonators inside the crystal. The prospect of engineering large, nanostructured laser crystals will provide a new basis for precision technology in metrological applications and allow for potentially new applications with ultra-strong deformable laser nanofibers in microelectronics and for drug delivery in medicine. © 2019 Science X Network (1). Evolution of pore size and cross-sectional aspect ratio as a function of laser power for linear and circular polarizations in YAG. (A) Power dependence of pore widths (in red) and heights (in blue) for linear (LP) and circular (CP) polarizations, measured from pores etched for 1h. (B) Dependence of cross-sectional pore aspect ratio (height divided by width) for linear and circular polarizations. (2) Etching crisscrossed nanopores. (A) The large index contrast between etched and un-etched pores is depicted in a raw bright-field transmission image. (B) 3D sketch of 90º crossing pores at different vertical offset positions. (C, D) SEM pictures of crossing pores at 90º and different crossing heights. Ag sputtered nanoparticles are also visible on the main surface. (E) Close-up view of the inner smooth surface of a pore. Credit: Nature Photonics, doi: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41566-018-0327-9 Journal information: Nature Photonics In the experiments, the scientists used a standard 3DLW with an ytterbium mode-locked ultrafast fiber laser (1030 nm wavelength and 350 fs pulse duration). A 1.4 numerical aperture (NA) oil-immersion objective was used to tightly focus the laser pulses inside the crystals. Ródenas et al. used computer-controlled XYZ linear stages for 3-D nanopositioning of the samples. After laser irradiation, they laterally polished the crystals to expose the irradiated structures followed by wet chemical etching. For this, the YAG crystals were etched in hot phosphoric acid in deionized water. A key technical limitation of the etching process was the difficulty in refreshing the exhausted acid inside the nanopores fabricated using the method detailed. , Nature Materials (1) Scheme to achieve infinitely long and homogeneously etched nanopore lattices by means of 3D-connecting etching pores. (A) 3D sketch of the vertical etching channels architecture for etching microstructured optical waveguides (MOWs). (B) SEM of a polished cut through a MOW partially revealing 3D etching pores. (C) Microscope top view of an etched array of MOWs with vertical etching channels every 80 µm. (2) Etching mm long pores in sapphire. a) Dark-field image of three arrays of 1-mm-long pores after 170 h of total etching time. Pores on each array were written at ~10 mW and at depths ranging from 4 to 30 µm. b) Example of pores written at medium power (9.4 mW) and 29 µm depth, after 30 min etching. c) Example of two pores written at 24 µm depth and at the photo-modification power threshold (~4 mW) for which no secondary pores are observed. Credit: Nature Photonics, doi: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41566-018-0327-9. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Citation: Three-dimensional femtosecond laser nanolithography of crystals (2019, January 15) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-01-three-dimensional-femtosecond-laser-nanolithography-crystals.html More information: Airán Ródenas et al. Three-dimensional femtosecond laser nanolithography of crystals, Nature Photonics (2018). DOI: 10.1038/s41566-018-0327-9Markus Deubel et al. Direct laser writing of three-dimensional photonic-crystal templates for telecommunications, Nature Materials (2004). DOI: 10.1038/nmat1155 Amit Banerjee et al. Ultralarge elastic deformation of nanoscale diamond, Science (2018). DOI: 10.1126/science.aar4165 , Science For example, laser lithography developed by the semiconductor industry is a surface-processing technique used for efficient etching of a range of materials, including silicon, silica glass and polymers. The process can produce high-quality two-dimensional (2-D) nanophotonic devices that can be extended to 3-D, which was demonstrated two decades ago with infrared femtosecond laser direct writing. However, the photopolymerized structures are impractical as they cannot be interfaced with other photonic elements. While 3-D nanostructured optical fibres have delivered functionalities well beyond those possible with ordinary unstructured glass to revolutionize nonlinear optics and optical communications, reliable manufacture of materials in crystalline media has remained elusive.Alternative methods include direct machining 3-D nanostructures with laser-induced dielectric breakdown and micro-explosions triggered inside transparent crystals to form voids and induce sub-micrometer structures within them. But such methods occurred at the risk of extended lattice damage and crack propagation. Therefore, despite efforts, a standard method for large-scale, 3-D volume crystal nanostructuring remains to be reported.In a recent study published in Nature Photonics, Airán Ródenas and co-workers at the Institute of Photonics and Nanotechnology and the Department of Physics departed from existing methods of engineering the crystal nanoarchitecture. Instead, they proposed a method whereby the inner chemical reactivity of a crystal, given by its wet etch rate, could be locally modified at the nanoscale to form dense nanopore lattices using multiphoton 3-D laser writing (3DLW). The interdisciplinary scientists showed that centimeter-long empty pore lattices with arbitrary features at the 100 nm scale could be created inside key crystals such as yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) and sapphire, typically used for practical applications. Ródenas et al. performed direct laser writing before etching, creating the desired pore architecture inside the solid-state laser crystal for photonic applications. New insight into nanopatterning diamond The scientists engineered the photonic structures using circular polarization to reproducibly create air pores in the nanoscale region below 200 nm. The nanophotonic structures (air pore photonic lattices) created in the crystal maintained spatial resolution equivalent to that obtained with state-of-the-art multiphoton polymerization lithography. For practical applications, nanophotonic devices require robust and efficient optical interconnections to form large, complex circuit designs with other optical elements. To achieve this, Ródenas et al. controlled the differential etch rate to maintain large pore lengths between the photomodified volumes and the surrounding crystal. They used scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to observe and prove the 3-D etching process. last_img read more

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Mamata leaves today for 3day Delhi visit to attend meet on 150th

first_imgKolkata: Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee will set out for her three-day-long visit to Delhi on Tuesday.Banerjee will be attending a meeting, where there will be discussion over the programme schedule to observe the 150th birth anniversary of Mahatma Gandhi. Prime Minister Narendra Modi will also be present in the meeting of the national level committee, comprising all chief ministers, Gandhians and eminent people from different walks of life. The Bengal government will also celebrate the 150th birth anniversary of the father of the nation and it will begin from October 2 at Gandhi Bhavan in Beliaghata. The state government has set up a 46-member committee with Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee as its chairperson and the committee has already held its first meeting. Also Read – Heavy rain hits traffic, flightsThe state government has taken all necessary measures for restoration of the Gandhi Bhavan. Besides organising essay competitions and publishing booklets, the state government has also decided to place a permanent chair in the name of Gandhiji at Calcutta University.The Chief Minister will be staying in Delhi till May 3. Though the main objective of her visit is to attend the May 2 meeting over the programme schedule to observe the 150th birth anniversary of Mahatma Gandhi, her visit has come up to be a crucial one, at a time when anti-BJP leaders from different states are in constant touch with her to form the Federal Front, to ensure a one-to-one fight in the general elections in 2019. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Merc, 2 B’deshi bystanders killedIt may be recalled that during her last visit to Delhi in March, she had met former Congress president Sonia Gandhi. She had held meeting with eminent leaders, including National Congress Party chief Sharad Pawar. In a recent development in connection with the formation of an anti-BJP front, Telangana Chief Minister K Chandrasekhar Rao and DMK working president MK Stalin had a telephonic conversation with Banerjee on Sunday. It may be recalled that Rao had held a meeting with Banerjee in Nabanna on March 19.last_img read more

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KMC faces difficulties to carry on beautification

first_imgKolkata: The recent central rules barring civic bodies from using MPLAD funds for renovation or beautification of waterbodies have posed difficulties for the Kolkata Municipal Corporation to carry on undertaking such works.A rejuvenation work for a large pond under the Green City project at the confluence of ward 92 and 104 in the city has been stalled because of this restriction.It may be mentioned that Trinamool Congress MP Jogen Chowdhury has recently allocated Rs 60 lakh from his MPLAD funds for renovation of the pond located near Sahid Nagar Bank Plot area. Also Read – Heavy rain hits traffic, flights”We had planned to take up renovation of the pond with priority. But the central directive prevented us from doing so. These funds have been diverted to the civil department of the Roads section under the KMC for road repair and similar activities,” said Swapan Samaddar, Member Mayor-in-Council (Environment).He added that the proposal seeking funds from the state government for renovating this pond has been forwarded. “We are hopeful that as this waterbody comes under the Green City project, we will get the requisite funds soon,” Samadder said. It may be mentioned that the KMC has taken up the renovation of as many as 37 waterbodies in the city under the Jal Dharo Jal Bharo project. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Merc, 2 B’deshi bystanders killedWork for renovation of some of these ponds have already started, while the tender for the remaining ones has already been floated. Under the Green City project, 159 waterbodies in the state will be renovated with a budget of around Rs 45 crore in 5 years. The KMC has started encouraging people, particularly the local unemployed youth to take up fish farming in the ponds that they have already renovated. “Our aim is to rope in the local unemployed youth to take up fish farming in these ponds. We hope that this will help us to bring down the tendency to fill up waterbodies for commercial purposes. It will also help in increasing fish production and supply to the local markets will also keep the price in check,” Samaddar said. It may be mentioned that Mayor Sovan Chatterjee, a few days back at a KMC programme, had expressed his concerns over integration of MPLAD funds in various projects with the Centre directing that MPLAD funds cannot be utilised through clubs or similar organisations even in welfare projects.last_img read more

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Pair the right eyewear with right attire

first_imgThe right kind of eyewear can make or break your entire look. While black rimmed glasses are for the fall season, oversized glasses look great with high waist trousers and polo T-shirt, suggest experts. Ishaan Kataria, Gem Opticians and Salesh Grover, Business Head, OSL luxury, have rolled out tips on how you can amp up your outfits with the perfect glasses:* Formal: The trending black rimmed glasses are meant for the fall season and the formal look. Another easy fit for any formal look is the gradient almost transparent lenses that can add the right amount of suave to your persona. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfFormal wear in classic hues of blue, grey, black should be accessorised with basic frames which do not subdue the simple and suave look.* Casual: Face shape and size is an important determinant to choose the eyewear. The double framed look (frame in frame look) with tinted lenses could make an interesting eyewear option.Pastel colour shirts, T-shirts go well with big framed or double framed glasses. Checkered shirts and a pair of shorts or jeans along with simple gold rimmed aviator also does the trick. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsive* Classic: The gold wired metal glasses are a classic and look radically cool. A much less aggressive version of an aviator adds an unusual sense of depth. Also the oversized wired metal glasses harkens back to the 1970’s, minus the weight.For that classic 1970’s look keep your outfit subtle and stylish. Like a pair of high waist trousers, polo T-shirt and oversized sunglasses.last_img read more

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Billboards Go HighTech

first_img 3 min read If that billboard off the highway suddenly changes from a promotion for a retail chain to a plug for a local car dealership, don’t get your eyes checked just yet. The next great frontier in outdoor and point-of-sale advertising is internet-connected digital screens, which vary in size from a few inches to many feet in length and width, allowing advertisers to showcase graphics and streaming media. Industry experts believe these boards will compete with, and may ultimately replace, traditional billboards and in-store signage.”It’s very reasonable to assume that up to 25 percent of traditional billboards could be converted [to digital displays] within the next 10 years,” says Stephen Freitas, chief marketing officer of the Outdoor Advertising Association of America Inc.That would translate into serious money. The OAAA estimates that advertisers spent $6.3 billion on outdoor advertising in 2005. With digital displays, messages can be updated with a few keystrokes instead of through the somewhat arduous process of tearing down a printed message and affixing a new one.In addition to outdoor applications, companies like The MediaTile Companyin Scotts Valley, California, are creating networks of in-store displays that are connected to the web. In MediaTile’s case, the networks use wireless cellular technology. Clients can upload and change content through web-based portals, creating content in the forms they want–anything from still image montages to narrowcasts, or live-action programming broadcast on a network of screens.”Once the networks are in, the screens can become a revenue stream through advertising and content creation,” says Keith Kelsen, MediaTile’s president and CEO. He adds that the screens can be used to feature product-specific information as part of a special display, or they can even broadcast employee-training programs. Setting up an electronic display system shouldn’t set you back too much: Kelsen estimates a business can install two screens for as little as $350, not including the costs of content creation and maintenance.The flexibility of these displays is driving demand, says Freitas. Big advertisers like McDonald’s can change their messages almost instantly, promoting breakfast sandwiches in the morning, salad options midday, and burgers and other fare during dinner hours. For smaller advertisers, digital displays can open up new possibilities, letting them share time on billboards in prime locations at a cost that suits their budgets.Freitas insists the emerging technology is a must-watch for the coming years: “Digital paper, or digital ink–a flexible material that can show different messages–is being developed,” he says. “It’s quite possible that this will have a significant impact on changing the scope of this type of advertising.” Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. This story appears in the July 2006 issue of Entrepreneur. Subscribe » Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global July 1, 2006 Register Now »last_img read more

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