Bumblebee director on replacing Michael Bay I couldnt go bigger

first_imgIt must be tough to direct your first live-action film with Steven Spielberg and Michael Bay looking over your shoulder. But for Travis Knight, director of Transformers spin-off Bumblebee, those two singular filmmakers weren’t just the movie’s producers, they provided the touchstones that inspired the film.”ET was my spirit animal in this movie”, explained Knight as I sat down with him in London to discuss Bumblebee. “I saw it when I was around 8 years old with my mom in a darkened theater and I was a big, blubbery mess at the end of it … On some levels Steven’s films from that era are responsible for me becoming a filmmaker.”And it shows: Not only is Bumblebee set in the 1980s, but the spirit of ’80s movies like ET and Short Circuit shine through in the adorable adventures of a girl and her robot buddy. CNET’s Holiday Gift Guide: The place to find the best tech gifts for 2018.Movie Magic: The secrets behind the scenes of your favorite films and filmmakers.  Now playing: Watch this: 1:34 Share your voice 2019 movies to geek out over TV and Movies Knight’s previous filmmaking experience was as an animator, directing the stunning stop-motion film Kubo and the Two Strings.”Stop motion is probably the subset of animation that’s closest to live-action,” he says, “in the sense you’re physically shooting these things with real lights and real cameras, and there’s props and sets and costumes and hair.”But there were still plenty of new things to learn on this, his first live-action film.”A lot of times I was flying by the seat of my pants,” he says, laughing.Knight brought what he called “an animator’s discipline and planning” to the film, mapping out each sequence in detail.”I do believe in the adage that the trimmer the vessel, the more it can carry,” he says. “Animation is very organized and disciplined. You can’t shoot coverage, you can’t play around. But in live-action, you can play around, and sometimes you’ll create little magical moments.” Enlarge ImageJohn Cena provides several comic highlights in Bumblebee. Jaimie Trueblood He particularly enjoyed John Cena’s ability to improvise in the role of a burly secret agent pursuing Bumblebee.”John’s like a one-man ad-lib factory. We would do the scenes, and then we get to the end of the scene, I’m like, ‘All right, John, now let’s play a little bit,’ and he would always do something really unexpected. He’s just a very, very clever, funny man.”Eye candyA major criticism of Bay’s past Transformers movies is the fast-paced computer-generated action, an assault on the senses that’s often hard to follow. While it has plenty of action, Bumblebee tones down the CG carnage. But Knight insists this shouldn’t be seen as a criticism of Bay’s style.”It wasn’t in any way addressing any feedback from the fans,” he says. “It was just a story I wanted to tell. That last one [Transformers: The Last Knight] is one of the biggest movies I’ve ever seen — and I couldn’t go bigger than that. So let’s go the other way, let’s focus in on a small corner of this canvas and really get to know one of these characters. Let’s balance the emotions with the explosions … The core relationship mattered to me more than anything else. And if that didn’t work, none of the other stuff matters. It’s just bombast. It’s just eye candy.”Mixing the spectacular, visual effects-driven action with a character-led story was “a high-wire act”, but Knight credits writer Christina Hodson for striking the right balance.”She’s gained something of a reputation in Hollywood as this kinda badass chick writer with these cool, action movies,” he says, “When you talk to her, the films that she always references are cool action movies like T2 … But when I sat down and talked to her about the film and my vision of it, I realized very quickly she has a big soft gooey heart just like I do.”Knight’s next big project is 2019’s Missing Link, a new stop-motion adventure from his animation studio Laika. As for where the Transformers movies go next, Knight is sanguine.”It’s hard to say. I think at this point, candidly, they’re probably just waiting to see how people react to [Bumblebee]. If people vote with their wallets for these kinds of Transformer movies, then they’ll get these kinds of Transformer movies.”Bumblebee opens in Australia on Dec. 20, in the US on Dec. 21 and in the UK on Dec. 24. Spielberg was a producer on Bumblebee, as was Michael Bay — the man who resurrected Transformers by directing all five previous movies in the series.”From a director’s perspective he was a dream producer,” Knight says of Bay. “We sat down early on and it was great for me, director to director, to pick his brain, to get a sense of his philosophy on the Transformers. He was really respectful and recognized this was someone else’s movie, my take on these characters, and the best thing that he could do was to support me and protect me. He let me do my thing, and I’m really appreciative of it.”Bay gave Knight one memorable piece of advice for working on a mega-budget franchise movie surrounded by people from the studio, the toy company and elsewhere all pulling a director in different directions.”He said the one thing you have to do is protect the movie,” Knight remembers. “That was advice Jerry Bruckheimer gave him, and he passed it on to me — remember the movie you intended to make and protect it.”  I do believe in the adage that the trimmer the vessel, the more it can carry. Travis Knight, Bumblebee director Post a comment 0 Tags 77 Photos Filmmakers Bumblebee transforms from action-packed to adorablelast_img read more

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Malware Attacks On Olympics Could Have Come From Russia And North Korea

first_img Share Natacha Pisarenko/APSpectators watch the mixed doubles bronze medal curling match between Russian athletes and Norway at the 2018 Winter Olympics in Gangneung, South Korea, on Tuesday.Cybersecurity experts are confirming that a computer malware attack dubbed “Olympic Destroyer” hit select networks and Wi-Fi systems at the Winter Games in Pyeongchang on Friday, but they would not say for sure whether Russia or North Korea are to blame.Users with a @pyeongchang2018.com email address were targeted in the attack, which lasted less than an hour on Friday night, experts said.The Pyeongchang Organizing Committee for the 2018 Olympic & Paralympic Games (POCOG) confirmed the cyberattack caused a malfunction of Internet protocol televisions (IPTVs) at the Main Press Center, according to South Korea’s Yonhap News.Yonhap reports that POCOG was forced to “shut down the servers to prevent further damage, leading to the closure of the Pyeongchang 2018 website.”“Due to the shutdown of the website, spectators who purchased tickets to 2018 Winter Games events were unable to print their reservations,” Yonhap says.According to Wired, though “neither Olympics organizers nor security firms are ready to point the finger at the Kremlin, the hackers seem to have at least left behind some calling cards that look rather Russian.”The magazine writes that Cisco’s Talos division, which deals with cyberthreats, “points out that Olympic Destroyer’s disruptive tactics and spreading methods resemble NotPetya and BadRabbit, two pieces of Ukraine-targeting malware seen in the last year that the Ukrainian government, the CIA, and other security firms have all tied to Russian hackers.”Some have speculated that Russian hackers may have targeted the Olympics because the country’s athletes were barred from competing under the Russian Federation flag due to a doping scandal that dates to the 2014 games in Sochi.The malware “turns off all the services, the boot information is nuked, and the machine is disabled,” Talos research director Craig Williams was quoted by Wired as saying.However, the malware deliberately pulls its punches. The software designed to wipe computer files “intentionally holds back from inflicting maximum damage. Instead of deleting all the files on a computer, it only deleted those related to booting up, meaning an average tech could fix it with relative ease. Researchers have never seen that sort of restraint before from that kind of malware,” according to Talos, BuzzFeed writes.A separate hacking operation, dubbed Operation GoldDragon, has attempted to infect target computers belonging to South Korean Olympics-related organizations with three separate malicious tools, according to the computer security firm McAfee Inc. The spyware “would enable hackers to deeply scour the compromised computers’ contents. McAfee identifies those malicious tools by the names GoldDragon, BravePrince, and GHOST419.”McAfee traced the phishing scheme that provided entry for the spyware “to a remote server in the Czech Republic, registered with fake credentials to a South Korean government ministry. And they found publicly accessible logs on that remote server that showed victim machines were in fact connecting to it from South Korea, a sign of actual infections,” Wired reports.Although McAfee won’t say for sure, the company’s chief scientist, Raj Samani, says his working theory is that the spyware attack is a North Korean operation.“It is clear attacks are ongoing and are likely to continue throughout the duration of the games. What is yet to be determined is if actors are working simply to gain disruption, or if their motives are greater,” McAfee Advanced Threat Research senior analyst Ryan Sherstobitoff says, according to ZdNet.Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.last_img read more

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