VIDEO State Rep Dave Robertson Talks With WCTV About His First 7

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — State Rep. Dave Robertson (D-Tewksbury) recently stopped by WCTV studios to discuss his first 7 months on the job and his committee assignments, as well as several important issues confronting Wilmington, including Olin, Route 38 and the North Wilmington train station.Watch the 30-minute interview between Robertson and WCTV Executive Director Shaun Neville below:— Video Playerhttps://wilmington.vod.castus.tv/vod/dl.php/0/0/1/6/4/3/00164308-e61b-4bb4-82db-aec83c7fc9ee1564592338.989+69375038.033@castus4-wilmington+15645969221564595197430114.vod.1080p.20190731_Discourse_Ep1_Dave_Robertson.mp4Media error: Format(s) not supported or source(s) not foundmejs.download-file: https://wilmington.vod.castus.tv/vod/dl.php/0/0/1/6/4/3/00164308-e61b-4bb4-82db-aec83c7fc9ee1564592338.989+69375038.033@castus4-wilmington+15645969221564595197430114.vod.1080p.20190731_Discourse_Ep1_Dave_Robertson.mp4?_=100:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.—Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedNews & Notes From WCTV: Learn About A Bill At The State House That Will Help WCTV & Other Local Access TV StationsIn “Community”ALL POLITICS ARE LOCAL: Robertson & Gordon Endorse Ed Markey With Possible Kennedy Showdown LoomingIn “Government”State Rep. Dave Robertson Announces June Office HoursIn “Government”last_img read more

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Watch the Porsche Taycan sprint to 124 mph 26 times in a

first_imgGetting to test the upcoming Porsche Taycan EV ahead of anyone else is pretty awesome. But what could make it even cooler? Being given the chance to beat the ever-loving heck out of the thing… for science.Jonny Smith of The Fully Charged Show on YouTube was recently given the chance to test the Porsche Taycan’s launch-control repeatability. For the test, Smith smashed the accelerator and sent Porsche’s first all-electric car to 124 miles per hour more than two dozen times. Despite the abuse, the time difference between the fastest and slowest runs was only 0.8 seconds.Porsche owes the Taycan’s repeat-launch-control ability to a few factors. The automaker points to the two permanent-magnet electric motors at each axle, which have a unique kind of assembly that allows more copper in each stator, improving output while simultaneously providing for more efficient cooling. Porsche also noted the thermal management system, which was built specifically for the Taycan to ensure this kind of repeatability. Enlarge ImageThat’s a lot o’ hustle. Porsche It goes without saying that Smith inevitably compares the Taycan’s capabilities to that of Ludicrous Mode in Tesla’s most powerful electrics. While the US automaker’s cars offer up warnings about repeated use of its brutal acceleration setting, the Taycan offers no such thing. It’s not nearly as quick as Tesla’s cars, but the repetition makes up for it.Since the car has yet to make its debut, which is set to change in a matter of weeks, Smith wasn’t able to show us anything about the car’s interior. The camera angles are all tight, hiding the dashboard, while a windshield-mounted camera shows Smith sitting on a seat that’s clearly been deliberately covered to hide its details. We’ll have to wait a little longer to see the whole thing, but it’s good to know that it can perform as a Porsche should. Share your voice Tesla Model 3 Review: Performance trim Now playing: Watch this: 2020 BMW M340i review: A dash of M makes everything better Electric Cars Luxury cars Performance Cars More From Roadshow Porsche 2019 Nissan Leaf Plus review: A better EV, but maybe not the best 42 Photos Porsche Taycan on ice in Sweden Porsche Ice drifting in Porsche’s all-electric Taycan Comments Tags 5:27 2last_img read more

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Ancient avian bones found in China may be oldest example of chicken

first_img Journal information: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (Phys.org) —A team of researchers in China studying ancient avian bones found in the northern part of that country, suspect the remains may be that of the oldest known example of chicken domestication. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the researchers describe their analysis and report on their findings. More information: “Early Holocene chicken domestication in northern China.” PNAS 2014 ; published ahead of print November 24, 2014, DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1411882111AbstractChickens represent by far the most important poultry species, yet the number, locations, and timings of their domestication have remained controversial for more than a century. Here we report ancient mitochondrial DNA sequences from the earliest archaeological chicken bones from China, dating back to ∼10,000 B.P. The results clearly show that all investigated bones, including the oldest from the Nanzhuangtou site, are derived from the genus Gallus, rather than any other related genus, such as Phasianus. Our analyses also suggest that northern China represents one region of the earliest chicken domestication, possibly dating as early as 10,000 y B.P. Similar to the evidence from pig domestication, our results suggest that these early domesticated chickens contributed to the gene pool of modern chicken populations. Moreover, our results support the idea that multiple members of the genus Gallus, specifically Gallus gallus and Gallus sonneratii contributed to the gene pool of the modern domestic chicken. Our results provide further support for the growing evidence of an early mixed agricultural complex in northern China.Press release Beijing Fatty Chicken, a local Chinese breed. Credit: Huagui Liu. Researchers track global dispersion of chickens throughout history using DNA Citation: Ancient avian bones found in China may be oldest example of chicken domestication (2014, November 25) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-11-ancient-avian-bones-china-oldest.htmlcenter_img Explore further © 2014 Phys.org Identifying the first culture to domesticate chickens has been hotly debated for over a century, without any clear winner, and it may remain that way as evidence is piling up suggesting that chickens were likely domesticated in a variety of places across the globe and have since undergone comingling, creating a mish-mash of genetic evidence. In this new effort, the researchers sought to find out if ancient bone samples found in four different archeological sites in northern China were chicken ancestors and if so, if they were domesticated. The bones were found alongside charcoal and other animal remains, such as dogs and pigs, both of which are believed to have been domesticated by that time in history, suggesting that the bird bones were from a species that had been domesticated as well. The excavation sites have also given up other findings which suggest the people who’d been barbecuing the animals were farmers, not hunters, which also adds credence to the idea that the birds they were eating were domesticated. The bones in question (39 in all) had been previously carbon dated to various ages, ranging from 2,300 to 10,500 years ago. The new research focused on gathering genetic evidence and using mitochondrial DNA sequencing to determine if the birds were chicken ancestors, or not. The team compared the DNA of the ancient birds with modern birds of the Galliformes order, which include rock partridges, pheasants and of course chickens and also to samples of ancient bones found in other places, such as Spain, Hawaii, Easter Island and Chile. Their analyses revealed that the birds were members of the genus Gallus, which includes modern chickens. But it’s still not enough to prove that they were actually the first example of domesticated chickens because there is still no conclusive proof that the birds were actually domesticated. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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Probiotics may improve cognition in Alzheimers patients

first_imgA daily dose of probiotics – live bacteria and yeasts – that are well-known to be good for the digestive system, can also help improve cognitive functioning in people with Alzheimer’s disease, researchers have found.Probiotics are known to give partial protection against certain infectious diarrhoeas, irritable bowel syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease, eczema, allergies, colds, tooth decay, and periodontal disease. Probiotics may boost cognition, as there is continuous two-way communication between the intestinal microflora, the gastrointestinal tract, and the brain through the nervous system, the immune system, and hormones (along the so-called “microbiota-gut-brain axis”), the researchers said.  Also Read – Add new books to your shelfIn mice, probiotics were found to improve learning and memory as well as reduce anxiety, depression- and OCD-like symptoms, however, there is very limited evidence of any cognitive benefits in humans, the study noted.However, in the clinical trial on a total of 52 women and men with Alzheimer’s between 60 and 95 years of age, the researchers found that a daily dose of probiotic Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium bacteria taken over a period of just 12 weeks could yield a moderate but significant improvement in the score of elderly Alzheimer’s patients on the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) scale — a standard measure of cognitive impairment. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsive“In a previous study, we showed that probiotic treatment improves the impaired spatial learning and memory in diabetic rats, but this is the first time that probiotic supplementation has been shown to benefit cognition in cognitively impaired humans,” said Mahmoud Salami, Professor at the University of Kashan in Iran.“These findings indicate that change in the metabolic adjustments might be a mechanism by which probiotics affect Alzheimer’s and possibly other neurological disorders,” Salami added. The study is published in the journal Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience.last_img read more

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Air New Zealand had woman removed from plane for refusing to watch

first_img WELLINGTON — Air New Zealand has become known for its over-the-top safety videos over the years, which range from big-budget nods to ‘The Hobbit’ to hilarious survival shorts starring Bear Grylls.But as fun and eye-catching as these videos are, the airline has learned that it still can’t force passengers to watch them. Or can it?On a recent flight from Wellington to Auckland, a female passenger was allegedly removed from the plane by police for failing to watch the inflight safety video.A police spokesperson told Newshub that “the passenger will receive an infringement notice under Civil Aviation Authority rules relating to the use of a cellphone.”According to reports, the woman was seated in the exit row but ignored flight attendants’ requests to pay attention. Said one witness: “A flight attendant said very patiently ‘Can you please watch what’s happening because this is the exit row?’ The flight attendant was super kind and kept asking her, but the woman put her fingers in her ears.”More news:  Honolulu authorities investigate arsons at 3 Waikiki hotels; no injuries reportedThe pilot eventually was forced to turn the plane around and return to the gate prior to takeoff, at which point the woman was escorted off the aircraft.Despite the woman’s obvious disregard for her safety and those around her, the news prompted renewed backlash against Air New Zealand’s Hollywood-esque videos. Another passenger on the flight who reportedly spoke to the Herald had some choice words for the airline:“I have to say that if watching the safety video is so crucial and you can be escorted off the plane, maybe Air New Zealand should stop making ‘Rachel Hunter ice cream ad’ safety videos. Just make a short video that is compulsory to watch and let people know if they don’t watch the video, the police will come and take them away,” said the passenger.New Zealand First MP Shane Jones is also a critic, calling the carrier’s previous safety ‘rap’ video, which was performed by Kiwi artists and set to the tune of Run DMC’s 80s hit, ‘It’s Tricky’, a “juvenile mish-mash” that trivializes safety.More news:  Venice to ban cruise ships from city centre starting next month“Tourists are confused. They can’t hear it. It’s a lame attempt at entertainment and it’s a type of entertainment that’s toneless. It’s cringe culture, really,” he said.The rap video caused so much controversy that Air New Zealand was forced to axe it less than six months after its debut. Air New Zealand had woman removed from plane for refusing to watch safety video Wednesday, May 8, 2019 Posted by Tags: Air New Zealand, Funnycenter_img Share << Previous PostNext Post >> Travelweek Group last_img read more

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