STUDENT SPOTLIGHT 4 Wilmington Students Named To Deans List At WPI

first_imgWORCESTER, MA — The following local residents were among 1,598 students from Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) named to the university’s Dean’s List for academic excellence for the spring 2019 semester:Zachary Abbott is a member of the class of 2019 majoring in civil engineering.Michael Gake is a member of the class of 2020 majoring in industrial engineering and professional writing.David Robie is a member of the class of 2021 majoring in aerospace engineering.Bridget Sullivan is a member of the class of 2020 majoring in mechanical engineering.The criteria for the WPI Dean’s List differs from most other universities as WPI does not compute a grade point average (GPA). Instead, WPI defines the Dean’s List by the amount of work completed at the A-level in courses and projects.“WPI’s academic programs are rigorous and require a level of independence beyond what is required in traditional courses. WPI students go beyond the classroom to work on open-ended problems in and for communities around the world. The problems are important and the impact is real,” said dean of undergraduate studies Arthur C. Heinricher. “Some of this nation’s best and brightest students come to WPI to study engineering and science and business and the humanities. Those named to the Dean’s List have excelled in all of their work, and we are exceptionally proud of these outstanding students.”About Worcester Polytechnic InstituteWPI, a global leader in project-based learning, is a distinctive, top-tier technological university founded in 1865 on the principle that students learn most effectively by applying the theory learned in the classroom to the practice of solving real-world problems. Recognized by the National Academy of Engineering with the 2016 Bernard M. Gordon Prize for Innovation in Engineering and Technology Education, WPI’s pioneering project-based curriculum engages undergraduates in solving important scientific, technological, and societal problems throughout their education and at more than 50 project centers around the world. WPI offers more than 50 bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral degree programs across 14 academic departments in science, engineering, technology, business, the social sciences, and the humanities and arts. Its faculty and students pursue groundbreaking research to meet ongoing challenges in health and biotechnology; robotics and the internet of things; advanced materials and manufacturing; cyber, data, and security systems; learning science; and more.(NOTE: The above announcement is from WPI via Merit.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… Related3 Wilmington Students Named To Dean’s List At WPIIn “Education”STUDENT SPOTLIGHT: 4 Wilmington Students Named To Dean’s List At WPIIn “Education”STUDENT SPOTLIGHT: 2 Wilmington Students Named To Dean’s List At WPIIn “Education”last_img read more

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Sexy selfies by women linked to economic inequality

first_imgWomen tend to post sexy selfies online more in environments with greater economic inequality, rather than where they might be oppressed because of their gender.The findings, published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), suggest that women take sexy selfies to compete with peers and climb the social ladder.”The argument is usually that when you see sexualisation, you see disempowerment,” said lead author Khandis Blake from University of New South Wales (UNSW) Sydney in Australia. Also Read – Add new books to your shelf”What we found instead is that women are more likely to invest time and effort into posting sexy selfies online in places where economic inequality is rising, and not in places where men hold more societal power and gender inequality is rife,” Blake added. For the study, the team analysed tens of thousands of social media posts across 113 countries.They tracked posts where people had taken selfies and then noted those that they were tagged sexy, hot or similar. The researchers explained that income inequality increases competitiveness and status anxiety among people at all levels of the social hierarchy, making them sensitive to where they sit on the social ladder and wanting them to do better than others.”That income inequality is a big predictor of sexy selfies suggests that sexy selfies are a marker of social climbing among women that tracks economic incentives in the local environment,” Blake said.”Rightly or wrongly, in today’s environment, looking sexy can generate large returns, economically, socially, and personally,” she added. The researchers then found the exact same pattern in real-world.last_img read more

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Why Apples Video That Imagines a World Without Apps Makes Me Sad

first_img To open its Worldwide Developers Conference, Apple showed a video that imagines what the world would be like if people suddenly lost access to all the apps on their iPhones. In short: pure chaos.In the three-minute spot, people lose the ability to navigate roads and cause accidents, one crazed woman hands out selfies and a couple actually swap faces by visiting a plastic surgeon. Funny, right? The point of the video was to show that the world, and of course Apple, needs developers to make the little programs that now dominate our lives.But watching the video, I couldn’t help but feel that it’s a fairly accurate portrayal of our increasing dependence on our pocket computers. According to data from Pew Research Center, 77 percent of Americans own a smartphone, and seven in 10 are on social media. And if you think that this trend is just linked to millennials, think again: Nielsen found that people between the ages of 35 and 49 spend an average of six hours and 58 minutes a week on social media, compared with six hours and 19 minutes for 18- to 34-year-olds. Those over 50 only spend an average of four hours and nine minutes a week on social media.Related: Feeling Depressed? Stay Off Instagram and Watch YouTube Instead.A different study, by the Royal Society for Public Health, revealed that 91 percent of 16- to 24-year-olds use the internet for social networking, and found a connection between social media use and increased rates of anxiety, depression and poor sleep. It points out that rates of anxiety and depression have increased 70 percent in the past 25 years (which is longer than smartphones have been ubiquitous). The organization is calling for social media companies to introduce “heavy usage” warnings on their platforms.”Social media has been described as more addictive than cigarettes and alcohol, and is now so entrenched in the lives of young people that it is no longer possible to ignore it when talking about young people’s mental health issues,” RSPH Chief Executive Shirley Cramer said in a statement accompanying the findings.For many people, the smartphone in their hand is an extension of themselves. They just wouldn’t be them without it. And that’s what this Apple video brings to light.But if you find this video speaks to you on a deeper level, do yourself a favor and take a break from technology every once in a while. Turn your phone off, explore the world without any help and resist that urge to take a picture and share it. And hey, maybe learn to navigate with a map. Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. 3 min readcenter_img Register Now » June 6, 2017last_img read more

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